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Fire Weather Watch issued July 12 at 1:18PM PDT until July 13 at 9:00PM PDT by NWS Los Angeles/Oxnard CA

…FIRE WEATHER WATCH IN EFFECT FROM 9 AM PDT SATURDAY MORNING
THROUGH 9 PM PDT SATURDAY EVENING FOR DRY THUNDERSTORMS FOR
INTERIOR MOUNTAINS, FOOTHILLS, AND VALLEYS OF LOS ANGELES,
VENTURA, SANTA BARBARA, AND SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTIES…

.An upper-atmospheric weather disturbance off the Pacific Coast
will interact with an influx of monsoonal moisture to create the
possibility for isolated to widely scattered thunderstorms across
portions of Southern California on Saturday. Average thunderstorm
motions will range from north-northwestward to north-
northeastward at 20 to 35 mph. While the risk for thunderstorms
will be present anytime from early Saturday morning through
Saturday night, the most-likely time window for thunderstorms will
be 9 AM PDT Saturday morning through 9 PM PDT Saturday evening.
Thunderstorms will be high-based and will produce little to no
precipitation. And given the moderate storm motions, isolated to
widely scattered dry thunderstorms will be possible on Saturday.
Thunderstorms will also be capable of producing gusty, erratic
outflow winds, gusting upwards of 45 to 60 mph on a localized
basis. With the ongoing extended heatwave, contributing to
significant drying of fuels, a significant fire-weather risk will
exist on Saturday.

The National Weather Service in Los Angeles/Oxnard has issued a
Fire Weather Watch for thunderstorms, which is in effect from
Saturday morning through Saturday evening.

* THUNDERSTORMS…Isolated to widely scattered dry thunderstorms
possible, capable of lightning-induced ignitions. Thunderstorms
will be high-based, and produce little, if any, precipitation.

* OUTFLOW WINDS…Strong and erratic outflow winds produced by the
dry thunderstorms, locally gusting to 45 to 60 mph, will have
the potential to cause rapid spread of any ongoing fires, as
well as any new fires. This includes the ongoing Lake Fire in
Santa Barbara County.

* IMPACTS…Conditions will be favorable for lightning-induced
ignitions from dry thunderstorms. Conditions will also be
favorable for rapid wildfire spread and extreme fire behavior
due to strong and erratic outflow winds. These conditions could
threaten life and property. In addition, hot temperatures will
bring the potential for large vertical plume growth. These
conditions have the potential to be EXTREMELY DANGEROUS for
wildfire operations.

San Luis Obispo announces new City Manager Friday

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. – On Friday, the San Luis Obispo City Council announced that Interim City Manager Whitney McDonald has been selected to fill the same position permanently.

The City Manager position is one of two staff roles directly appointed by the City Council, the other being the City Attorney, and is responsible for hiring City staff, managing the City’s budget, overseeing the day-to-day operations of the City, and carrying out the policy directions of the City Council.

McDonald will be responsible for a staff of over 480 employees and a budget of around $225 million detailed the City of San Luis Obispo in a press release about the announcement.

“During our very thorough recruitment process, it became clear that Whitney is the right person to lead and elevate our organization into the future,” said San Luis Obispo Mayor Erica A. Stewart. “She brings an impressive breadth of experience serving public sector agencies for the past 17 years and has a depth of knowledge in housing, land use, development, and environmental issues. Her local expertise and action-oriented, problem-solving style will help us address the most important challenges facing our City as well as implement our ambitious Major City Goals.”

McDonald served for several months as the Assistant City Manager and took over the City Manager position on an interim basis after the departure of former City Manager Derek Johnson.

The ad hoc committee appointed by the City Council to decide on a new, permanent City Manager, considered 59 qualified applicants from a nationwide pool and provided recommendations during a closed session of the full City Council which ultimately selected McDonald shared the City of San Luis Obispo.

“Whitney distinguished herself in that impressive pool and gained the unanimous support of the Council to serve as the San Luis Obispo’s next City Manager,” explained Mayor Stewart. “We are excited to work with Whitney to continue engaging and serving our community well.”

McDonald has signed her employment contract with a formal start date to be adopted during the City Council’s regular meeting on Aug. 20.

“I am truly honored to serve in this role as San Luis Obispo’s City Manager and look forward to deepening partnerships with community members, businesses, and regional partners,” stated McDonald regarding the decision. “We have a lot to do together, and I am eager to continue working with the community, the City Council and City staff to accomplish our strategic goals.”

Prior to joining the staff of the City of San Luis Obispo, McDonald served as the Community Development Director and then City Manager for Arroyo Grande.

McDonald received a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

The post San Luis Obispo announces new City Manager Friday appeared first on News Channel 3-12.

County closes Lake San Antonio because of die-off

By KAREN VELIE Amid an ongoing fish die-off, Monterey County officials have temporarily closed Lake San Antonio. After discovering dead fish floating in the lake during the July 4 holiday, the county contacted the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. State employees initially determined extreme heat depleted the water of oxygen leading to the deaths […]

Fire crews open a second incident base at the Santa Maria Speedway in Nipomo for the Lake Fire

NIPOMO, Calif. — Fire crews moved into a second base today at the Santa Maria Speedway in Nipomo to house hundreds of firefighters battling the Lake Fire.

There are now 3,229 firefighters working 24 hours a day to help contain the fire in the Santa Ynez Valley that began a week ago.

The Lake Fire has burned 34,015 acres and is 16% contained as of Thursday.

Santa Barbara County Fire Department’s Public Information Officer Scott Safechuck said to stay proactive firefighters are coming from across California and out of state.

Firecrews head back to base after a long shift in the steep terrain where they can eat, hydrate, shower, and sleep.

Overnight the fire grew 4,000 acres, fire officials said it was due to wind conditions and efforts from fire crews.

“We had favorable wind. We had favorable fuel conditions with light, flashy grassy fuels and annual grass. And we were able to, do a coordinated effort of lighting that grass on fire, pushing that fire back into the main, the main fire and really starting to secure that area. There was a great effort,” said Safechuck.

Safechuck said the fire is being divided by two zones and is assigned to different agencies to help work more strategically.

“The fire has been divided into a north zone and a south zone, and it allows us to be really effective in the way that we manages or manage our resources. So we have kind of more of a federal resource, more federal resources in the north end of the fire and more state and local resources on the south end of the fire. And we’re working together to to battle this fire,” said Safechuck.

Fire officials continue to encourage people to sign up for alerts on readysbc.org, follow evacuation orders and prepare to leave when you receive a warning.

The post Fire crews open a second incident base at the Santa Maria Speedway in Nipomo for the Lake Fire appeared first on News Channel 3-12.

Excessive Heat Warning issued July 11 at 8:38PM PDT until July 13 at 9:00PM PDT by NWS Los Angeles/Oxnard CA

* WHAT…Dangerously hot conditions with high temperatures of 102 to
112 degrees, and very warm nights.

* WHERE…A portion of southwest California.

* WHEN…Until 9 PM PDT Saturday.

* IMPACTS…There is a high risk for dangerous heat illness for
anyone, especially for the very young, the very old, those without
air conditioning, and those active outdoors.